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Top Page > Exhibitions

Current Exhibitions

Portraits of Modern China—Living in Art Works

Children Playing in the Garden by Jie Wen, Qing Dynasty (1800)

Regular Exhibition

Portraits of Modern China—Living in Art Works

June 15 (Tue.), 2021 – August 15 (Sun.)

50 portrait pieces created from the Qing Dynasty to the modern age (mid 19th to mid 20th centuries) will be exhibited from our second generation Kuboso Collection and Chinese modern art collection (Teiseido Collection) donated by Hayashi Munetake. Many Chinese painters at that time not only learned the traditional style but were also influenced by new theories and techniques from Western countries, as well as Japan, during a time of rapid and radical social change brought about by modernization. The displays will include portraits that introduce subjects from all walks of life, from famous Taoists and Buddhists, to hermits living a secluded existence, and ordinary men, women and children.

Distant View of Donkey Riders by Ren Bonian, Qing Dynasty (1890)
Beauty Viewing Plum Blossoms by Ni Tian, Qing Dynasty to Republic of China (late 19th to early 20th century)
White-Robed Kannon by Qi Baishi, Republic of China (20th century)
Moon Shadow in the Garden by Feng Zikai, Republic of China to contemporary period (20th century)
Hama and Tieguai by Wang Yiting, Republic of China (1930)
Washing Feet by Chang Dai-chien, Republic of China (1934)

Scheduled Exhibitions

Portraits of Modern China—Living in Art Works

Children Playing in the Garden by Jie Wen, Qing Dynasty (1800)

Regular Exhibition

Portraits of Modern China—Living in Art Works

June 15 (Tue.), 2021 – August 15 (Sun.)

50 portrait pieces created from the Qing Dynasty to the modern age (mid 19th to mid 20th centuries) will be exhibited from our second generation Kuboso Collection and Chinese modern art collection (Teiseido Collection) donated by Hayashi Munetake. Many Chinese painters at that time not only learned the traditional style but were also influenced by new theories and techniques from Western countries, as well as Japan, during a time of rapid and radical social change brought about by modernization. The displays will include portraits that introduce subjects from all walks of life, from famous Taoists and Buddhists, to hermits living a secluded existence, and ordinary men, women and children.

Distant View of Donkey Riders by Ren Bonian, Qing Dynasty (1890)
Beauty Viewing Plum Blossoms by Ni Tian, Qing Dynasty to Republic of China (late 19th to early 20th century)
White-Robed Kannon by Qi Baishi, Republic of China (20th century)
Moon Shadow in the Garden by Feng Zikai, Republic of China to contemporary period (20th century)
Hama and Tieguai by Wang Yiting, Republic of China (1930)
Washing Feet by Chang Dai-chien, Republic of China (1934)

Tosa and Sumiyoshi Schools II —The Development of the Yamatoe Painting Style and the Outstanding Characteristic of Each School

“The Oak Tree” from The Tale of Genji on a Fan by Tosa Mitsuoki

Special Exhibition

Tosa and Sumiyoshi Schools II —The Development of the Yamatoe Painting Style and the Outstanding Characteristic of Each School

September 12 (Sun.), 2021 – November 7 (Sun.)

As a sequel to the 2018 exhibition “Tosa and Sumiyoshi Schools—The Lightness and Solemnity in Yamatoe Paintings,” this exhibition will be held to introduce the progression of Yamatoe paintings over the entire Edo Period, once again featuring these two schools. It will first focus on the development of this particular style of the time to provide an outline, and then investigate how these schools embraced and inherited the traditional Yamatoe style while surrounded by active artists from other schools, such as Kano, Maruyama, Shijo, Bunjinga and Rin. It will also attempt to examine the roles of the artists of these schools and how both contributed so much to art history. With this exhibition, we hope to encourage the world to recognize the amazing works of the Yamatoe Schools, which have, up to now, been considered a rather minor part of Edo art history.

The Tale of Genji on Folding Screen by Tosa Mitsuoki, Tokyo National Museum
“The Oak Tree” from The Tale of Genji on a Fan by Tosa Mitsuoki, Kuboso Memorial Museum of Arts, Izumi

Gold and Silver Ornaments—Decorative Crafts of Japan and China

Sword guard with a warrior design

Regular Exhibition

Gold and Silver Ornaments—Decorative Crafts of Japan and China

November 28 (Sun.) – December 26 (Sun.), 2021 & January 5 (Wed.) – 23 (Sun.), 2022

This exhibition mainly features decorative metallic crafts created from ancient to modern times in Japan and China, with the main focus on sword guards produced between the Muromachi and Edo Periods in Japan and belt buckles produced between the Warring States and Han Periods in China. Despite the differences in countries and periods, all the items have distinctive designs with elaborate gold and silver craft techniques employed. The exhibition includes around 150 pieces from our collection, showcasing the extravagance of the times. These pieces include golden accessories from the ancient Kofun (tumulus) period and sword parts, such as hilts, used by warriors during the civil-war periods in Japan, as well as gold and silver accessories and gold-coated bronze horse riding tools in China.

Golden earrings, Kofun (tumulus) period of Japan
Sword guard with an iris design, Momoyama period
Sword guard with a warrior design, Edo period
Sword hilt with a dragon design, Edo period
Bronze belt buckle with a dragon and phoenix design with gold and silver inlay, Warring States period of China
Bronze belt buckle overlayed with gold and silver with an animal design, Warring States period of China
Silver hair accessory coated with gold and a flower and foliage design, Three Kingdoms period to Northern and Southern Dynasties period of China

Harmony between Waka Poems and Paintings—Poets, Genji Paintings, and Hyakunin Isshu

An Album of Illustrated Scenes from The Tale of Genji (Important cultural property) by Tosa Mitsuyoshi (1612)

Regular Exhibition

Harmony between Waka Poems and Paintings—Poets, Genji Paintings, and Hyakunin Isshu

February 6 (Sun.), 2021 – March 27 (Sun.)

This exhibition has been designed to provide an opportunity to experience the world of art depicting the world of literature, and features a variety of pieces with subjects related to waka poems (e.g., poets and contents) and scenes from The Tale of Genji. The latter are specifically called “Genjie,” or Genji paintings, and those from the Momoyama Period or later, including an Important Cultural property, will be exhibited this time. There will also be ukiyoe works on Hyakunin Isshu (one hundred waka by one hundred poets) from the Edo Period. The waka-themed pieces, especially, include a diversity of styles. For example, “Segment of Comparison of Coupled Poems Chosen from Anthologies of Different Periods” from the Kamakura Period depicting a scene where two people read poems from different ages in turn, a collection of paintings of noted poets from the Muromachi and Edo Periods, paintings on screens depicting scenes of poems, and different types of books and woodblock prints on Hyakunin Isshu from the Edo Period.

An Album of Illustrated Scenes from The Tale of Genji (Important cultural property) by Tosa Mitsuyoshi (1612)
Segment of Comparison of Coupled Poems Chosen from Anthologies of Different Periods, Kamakura period
New Anthology of Thirty-Six Poetic Immortals by Tosa Mitsunari, Edo period
Thirty-Six Immortal Poets by Sumiyoshi Jokei, Edo period
Female Immortal Poets by Hishikawa Moronobu (1682)
Pictures of Hyakunin Isshu by Utagawa Toyokuni III (1843 to 1847)

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